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Ingredients Of Dermal Fillers: What Are They?

Dr. Vi Sharma has worked in the field of cosmetic surgery

He has a Bachelor of Medicine & Bachelor of Surgery, Monash University; and former member of the Australasian College of Aesthetic Medicine and the Royal Australian College of General Practice.

You have no doubt already heard of dermal fillers, or as they are more commonly called facial fillers. They are a bunch of substances injected underneath the skin of your face to restore lost volume due to aging. These fillers can be used in various areas of your face, covering almost the whole of it. Not only are they very universal, but their effects have proven to be eye-catching. Moreover, they are also among the minimal-risk cosmetic treatments available.

However, it is always good to know what you are putting inside your body before you do. For example, everyone is talking about dermal fillers and the effects of specific substances, but what exactly are those substances? Where do they come from? Are they minimal-risk to use? These are only some of the questions this article will surely help answer.

Ingredients Of Dermal Fillers

Ingredients Of Dermal Fillers

Dermal fillers are made from a variety of ingredients, each with its own unique properties and uses. Some of the most common ingredients used in dermal fillers include:

  • Hyaluronic acid: This is a naturally occurring substance in the body that helps to hydrate and plump the skin. It is found in many types of dermal fillers.
  • Calcium hydroxylapatite: This is a mineral-based substance that is similar in structure to the mineral in human bones. It can provide a long-lasting, natural-looking result.
  • Poly-L-lactic acid: It is a synthetic substance that can stimulate collagen production in the skin, leading to a natural-looking result.
  • Polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA): This is a synthetic polymer that can provide a long-lasting, but more artificial-looking result.
  • Autologous fat: This is a transfer of the patient’s own fat from another body area such as the stomach or thigh.

It’s important to note that the different ingredients have different properties and the result will vary depending on the type of dermal filler used. It’s important to discuss with a qualified and experienced provider to know which dermal filler is best suited for you and your needs.

The most common ingredient: HA

One of the most popular active ingredients in dermal fillers is HA. Chances are, you probably have already heard about it a couple of times. A vast majority of dermal filler treatments use fillers based on HA. But what is it exactly, you ask? HA actually occurs naturally in our bodies, produced by the skin cells, but with age, that production slows down.

Since HA is natural to our bodies, it is improbable that someone will be allergic to it, making it one of the minimal-risk fillers. Moreover, the unique ability of HA is its capacity to hold high levels of moisture. Due to this, when injected underneath the skin, it fills up the areas that have lost volume, hydrates the skin, and makes our facial features more prominent. It also minimal-riskly breaks down after about six to eighteen months but can be easily dissolved even if anything goes wrong.

When used as a filler, the effects of HA are visible immediately. The skin instantly gains volume and looks way smoother. Moreover, the procedure itself is Minimally painful due to lidocaine which is often a part of the filler.

An alternative worth considering: calcium hydroxylapatite

Known more widely as Radiesse, calcium hydroxylapatite is a common alternative to HA. It works similarly, with its effects showing immediately, but it does not just sit there and wait for the body to break it down. Calcium hydroxylapatite continues to boost the production of natural collagen in our bodies, further prolonging the effects of the treatment.

It might even have some permanent effects on our skin. While the filler generally lasts from twelve to eighteen months due to the boost of collagen production, some of the impacts will stay

A different approach: poly-l-lactic acid

This filler works in quite a unique way when compared to the ones described before. Unlike hyaluronic acid and calcium hydroxylapatite, poly-l-lactic acid does not provide immediate results, but that does not mean that it is any worse than the other two! Quite contrary, as in the final count, poly-l-lactic creates more long-lasting results than its competitors.

But how does it accomplish that? Well, the main thing about poly-l-lactic acid is that is not just simply a filler. Its main objective is to boost the natural production of collagen in our bodies, and it works as a sort of scaffolding to help the collagen fibers grow. The effects are thus not immediate but happen over time as the collagen gets rebuilt, making for a much more natural look.

Moreover, the effects of poly-l-lactic acid fillers are known to outlast the other two kinds. With the effects gaining their full potential over several weeks, they tend to last even as long as two years! This quality makes poly-l-lactic acid a competitor worth considering, especially if you want a more natural look and longer-lasting results.

Interested in Dermal Fillers? Give Skin Club a call and let us pick the correct cosmetic procedure for your situation! Contact Now!

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About Dr Vi

Dr Vi Sharma is a renowned and highly trained cosmetic surgeon in Sydney, practising cosmetic surgery since 2012. He has a worldwide loyal patient base. He has a bachelor of medicine and a Bachelor of Surgery from Monash University. Dr Vi Sharma is a former member of the Australasian College of Aesthetic Medicine and the Royal Australian College of General Practice. Along with treating patients, he also provides training for doctors and nurses regarding aesthetic and cosmetic treatment modalities.

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